All Posts By

Stephanie Scotti

What Wall Climbing Taught Me About Giving Powerful Presentations…and Life in General

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“On belay…Belay on!” If you’ve ever taken rock or wall climbing lessons, you are familiar with this call and response. Belaying refers to a variety of techniques climbers use to communicate and keep each other safe during a climb. When the lower climber (AKA the belayer) has secured the rope, she calls up, “On belay”—my translation: “I’ve got your back. You’re good to go.” The higher climber then responds, “Belay on” before moving to the next hand or foothold.

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Secrets for Improving On-Camera and Cross-Platform Communication

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Even for executives accustomed to delivering a presentation to hundreds, or even thousands, of people, speaking on camera can be an unexpected challenge. What looks comfortable and confident on a stage can appear stiff and lifeless on video. It’s important to master this skill, because speaking in this video-driven world with poise and authenticity is essential for taking advantage of an ever-increasing variety of communication platforms, from webinars and virtual meetings to promotional videos.

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Successful Webinars: Proven Strategies from the Pros

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If you’re a business leader, chances are you get invited to webinars at least weekly. This is not surprising, since the medium offers the chance to reach both broad and targeted audiences to educate, establish thought leadership, build brand awareness or generate sales leads. The problem is, so many webinars turn out to be disappointing. Why? The content doesn’t deliver on the promise, the technology is poorly managed, or the delivery is far from compelling.

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The Team Sales Pitch: How to Prep for Success

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When your company has the opportunity to pitch for a really big piece of new business, the stakes are as high as they get for your sales team. Yet many organizations squander those opportunities by failing to properly prepare for the pitch “team” presentation. Each speaker tends to develop his or her own part in a silo. Members of the sales team might not even have the chance to hear one another before the big day. As a result, you lack a cohesive message, you repeat yourselves, and you might even contradict one another. The prospect can’t help but think you don’t have your act together.

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